Care for Your Colon!

Happy mature woman outdoor portrait Colorectal cancer is preventable and treatable when detected early. There are certain risk factors that affect a person’s chance of getting cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors cannot be changed, such as a person’s age or family history. Other factors can be controlled to minimize a person’s risk for getting cancer. There are six factors that have been linked to colorectal cancer.

1. Eat a Healthy Diet A diet high in vegetables, fruits, and whole grains has been linked to decreased risk of colorectal cancer. Add a variety of vegetables and fruit to your daily diet. Replace refined grain products made with white flour with whole grains like oats, spelt, and whole wheat.

2. Stay Active Regular physical activity can significantly lower your risk of getting colorectal cancer. Adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week. It all adds up, so it’s okay to start small by adding just a few minutes of movement at a time.

3. Watch Your Weight Being overweight or obese increases your risk of getting colorectal cancer. Eating a balanced diet and staying physically active can help you reach or maintain a healthy weight.

4. Don’t Smoke Smokers are more likely than non-smokers to develop and die from colorectal cancer. If you smoke and you want to quit, see the American Cancer Society’s Guide to Quitting Smoking or visit Idaho’s ProjectFilter.org.

5. Limit Alcohol Colon cancer has been linked to heavy drinking. It is recommended to limit alcohol to no more than 2 drinks a day for men and 1 drink a day for women. A single drink amounts to 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1½ ounces of hard liquor.

6.Get Screened Read more…

Please like & share:

Women are special.

Heart Disease

Heart disease – it is the #1 killer of women in America. Cardiovascular disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 American women’s deaths each year. Breast cancer takes 1 in 31 American women’s lives each year. In spite of these numbers, many women live more in fear of breast cancer striking than heart disease. Both are important women’s health issues; both deserve the time and attention of all women. Be in the know about heart disease and women. Know the warning signs, know the risk factors, and know how to stay healthy. Heart disease is not just a man’s disease; it is not just for “old” people; it does not occur just in frail or inactive people. Get the facts.

What are you doing to take care of your heart?

Please like & share:

F.A.S.T.

Electronic Blood Pressure Cuff

In the course of our conversation at a meeting, I was stunned to learn that my tablemate had suffered a stroke. She was all of 34. She looked “normal” – she was bright, conversive, and appeared to be in reasonably good physical condition. Imagine my shock. You see, I know about strokes. Old people have them. In fact, my Dad died from one. Way back in my memory, I knew younger people could have one but somehow I had chosen to ignore that fact. This conversation brought it back, front and center. No matter what your age, you should know the warning signs of a stroke. This woman did and that’s what saved her from a lifetime of disability, or worse – death.

How about you? Do you know the warning signs? Take a minute to get in touch with your blood pressure. Know your numbers and understand what they mean. Record your numbers on a tracking sheet that you can give your doctor. If your blood pressure tends to be high, buy a home blood pressure monitor. If you are uncertain how to use it, check out the online instructional video. You’ll be a pro in no time.

Remember how to spot the signs…

F: Face Drooping
A: Arm Weakness
S: Speech Difficulty
T: Time to Call 911

Please like & share:

No Buts About It!

Pipes

Your colon is a critical part of your plumbing system. After so many years, you need to have a look at the pipes to be sure everything is working well, check for general wear and tear, and find anything that could cause a future disaster. Just like the pipes in your home, it’s easy to put off an inspection and it’s never convenient when the system goes down. No one likes surprises. So, do yourself a favor. Read the Screening Guidelines. Get checked, if it’s your time. Use the resources on Your Colon.  Read Straight Talk About Colon Cancer.  As a  friend of mine says, “Colonoscopies are like plungers. It’s better to get one before you absoultely need it.”

Please like & share:

Your Colon


Feeling a little embarrassed to talk about your colon? Colon health isn’t really “coffee table talk”, but come on – we all own one! So, get comfortable with your colon. Talk to your doctor. Learn the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer. Know the screening guidelines. Get a free at-home kit. Review the resources; walk through the “inflatable colon”. Colon embarrassment is not worth dying over. For a practical and fun take on colonoscopies, watch the 2.5 minute “Jo-Jo Video”.

Please like & share:

Are You Man Enough?

Not counting some forms of skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men, and second only to lung cancer in the number of cancer deaths (CDC).  Know the symptoms and risk factors. September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and there are numerous free or low-cost screening clinics across Idaho beginning on 9/11. If you’re in the Treasure Valley area, register for the FREE Noon-hour seminar Are You Man Enough? presented on 9/27  by Dr. Linda Lam with the Saint Alphonsus Medical Group. Lunch is provided as part of this seminar so register now! Women are welcome to register.

Stop with the old worn-out excuses … No news is good news… I feel just fine… Why borrow trouble?… My wife/partner takes care of those things…  I just don’t have the time or money right now…

Don’t let excuses stand in the way of your good health!

Please like & share: